LOCKHEED MARTIN CASE

Means Gillis Law, PC represented five (5) plaintiffs, including the families of two (2) victims killed and two (2) victims who were left with serious permanent injuries, as a result of the racially motivated shootings at the Lockheed Martin facility in Meridian, Mississippi, on July 8, 2003, by one of its employees, Doug Williams. The families and victims sued Lockheed Martin for failure to provide for the safety and security of its employees and for allowing the creation and perpetuation of the racially charged work environment, which resulted in fourteen (14) people being shot, including Williams, who turned the gun on himself. An independent investigation by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) concluded that African-American employees were racially harassed, intimidated and threatened with death, and that Lockheed Martin was aware of the severity and extent of the racially charged and hostile environment created by Williams. Because of the company’s inadequate handling of the matter, Lockheed Martin permitted the racially charged atmosphere to grow in intensity, culminating in the shooting of 14 people (EEOC letter, June 6, 2004).

 

HOOD V. GREYHOUND
BUS DEATH AND INJURY CASES IN TENNESSEE & GEORGIA

In October of 2001, six (6) people were killed and numerous others were injured when a bus crashed in Tennessee after the driver was attacked by one of its passengers. We were hired by the families of the three passengers who died in the crash. Although many other lawyers thought we would not be able to prove that the bus company was at fault, through use of very aggressive discovery tactics, we uncovered evidence that during the five (5) previous years, the company’s bus drivers had been attacked by passengers at a rate of at least once per month. Despite these attacks, the company negligently failed to provide a shield which would have prevented passengers from reaching and being able to attack its drivers.

 

Nursing Home Abuse Cases

The nursing home resident was physically abused by one of the employees of the nursing home. We were able to prove a pattern of abuse and neglect of the nursing home resident.

A nursing home resident died of aspiration pneumonia caused by the nursing home’s failure to prove appropriate treatment and services for a patient who was fed by a nasal gastric tube. We were also able to prove a pattern of abuse and neglect of this patient.

Nursing home resident died from sepsis related to pressure sores received at a nursing home. We were able to prove that the nursing home failed to provide the treatment and services necessary to prevent the development of pressure sores and further failed to treat and provide services to heal pressure sores developed while a resident at the nursing home. We were also able to prove a pattern of abuse and neglect.

We obtained a settlement for our client whose mother died of sepsis caused by bed sores and urinary tract infections while in a nursing home.

 


 

Health Care Provider & Fraud Cases

Our client was told by physicians at a hospital that she would deliver her third child vaginally and with the assistance of a nurse mid-wife rather than a doctor despite the fact that her second child was delivered by way of Cesarean section. Despite obvious signs of fetal distress on the fetal heart monitor, the nurse midwife negligently failed to recognize that our client’s uterus had ruptured and that placental abruption had occurred. The baby was delivered with catastrophic birth injuries by way of Cesarean section. The case settled because we were able to show that the hospital was negligent in forcing our client to have a vaginal delivery without the care of a physician.

A well-known health insurer sold outpatient riders to its health insurance policy. Hidden within the fine print of the insurance contract was a provision that the policy would only pay if the insured incurred a “room charge” during outpatient visits. We were able to prove that the insurer knew that its insured would not have a room charge during the course of an outpatient visit.